Get Smart About Asthma Control

There is no known cure for asthma, but with proper care you can reduce chronic inflammation of the large and small airways and reduce asthma attacks.1 There are important steps you can take to control asthma, starting with knowing what"control" really means.

There is a difference between control and relief. You may find relief with a quick-relief inhaler, but this does not necessarily mean you are effectively treating the inflammation in your airways or managing your asthma overall.2 In fact, if you are using a quick-relief inhaler more than twice a week, other than for exercise-related symptoms, your asthma may not be controlled.3 When dealing with persistent asthma, control is about treating chronic inflammation and preventing symptoms before they occur.4

Take Control of Asthma Management

If you or your child is experiencing symptoms of asthma such as persistent coughing, shortness of breath, tightness in your chest or a whistling or wheezing sound when you breathe, it is time to see a doctor and discuss treatment options. If you or your child is using a quick-relief inhaler more than twice a week other than for exercise-related symptoms, or if a current treatment isn’t working, it may be time to discuss a new treatment plan. By discussing your asthma symptoms and the impact asthma is having on your or your child’s life, a doctor can work with you to develop the best Asthma Action Plan.

References
  1. National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. Patients, Families and Caregivers. Available at: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/prof/lung/asthma/naci/audiences/patients-families.htm. Accessed September 7, 2012.
  2. American Academy of Asthma and Immunology. Asthma Triggers and Management: Tips to remember. Available at: https://www.aaaai.org/conditions-and-treatments/library/at-a-glance/asthma-triggers-and-management.aspx. Accessed September 11, 2012.
  3. Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. Know your Asthma Numbers. Available at: http://www.aafa.org/print.cfm?id=8&sub=17&cont=589. Accessed September 11, 2012.
  4. National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. How is asthma treated and controlled? Available at: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/asthma/treatment.html. Accessed September 11, 2012.